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SWG-logo_FINAL_4-300x300

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Captive Female Soala
Captive Female Soala

Female saola, Lak Xao, Bolikhamxay Province, Laos. Copyright 1996 William Robichaud.

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Patrol team with wire snares
Patrol team with wire snares

Patrol team with wire snares collected in saola habitat, central Laos (Nakai-Nam Theun National Protected Area). Copyright 2009 by William Robichaud.

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SWG-logo_FINAL_4-300x300

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Get Involved!  Find Your Passion!

 Conserve What You Love!  

 

Care for Karamoja
Care for Karamoja

Karamoja is a region in the northeast corner of Uganda, which is home to 65 endangered Rothschild’s giraffes, 900 ostriches, and over 785,000 food insecure people. Care for Karamoja is working with several partners, including the Uganda Wildlife Education Centre, to implement a program to instruct local farmers in the sustainable, captive breeding of ostriches. This program will reduce poaching pressure on giraffes & ostriches, plus improve the lives of people.

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Baby Face
Baby Face

The average gestation period for giraffe is approximately 15 months (453-464 days).

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Rothschild's Giraffe
Rothschild's Giraffe

Giraffe use their 18-20 inch long prehensile tongue and the roof of their mouths in order to feed on a range of different plants and shoots, most notably from Acacia species.

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Care for Karamoja
Care for Karamoja

Karamoja is a region in the northeast corner of Uganda, which is home to 65 endangered Rothschild’s giraffes, 900 ostriches, and over 785,000 food insecure people. Care for Karamoja is working with several partners, including the Uganda Wildlife Education Centre, to implement a program to instruct local farmers in the sustainable, captive breeding of ostriches. This program will reduce poaching pressure on giraffes & ostriches, plus improve the lives of people.

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Okapi Conservation Project
Okapi Conservation Project

The Okapi Conservation project is managed by White Oak Conservation Center, Inc. (WOCC) a not-for-profit organization founded in 2001 to conserve threatened species through the support of training, research, education, community outreach and protection. Thanks to the generous support of our donors, foundations and partner organizations WOCC has raised over $15M since its inception for wildlife conservation.

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Okapi butts drive me nuts!
Okapi butts drive me nuts!

The ‪okapi‬ is a gentle giant that quietly roams the forest for food and shelter. Their coloration, which often causes people to think they are a cross between a zebra and an antelope, keeps them hidden among the partial sunlight that filters through the dense rain forest.

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Adorable!
Adorable!

Baby Okapi are called calves. Newborns can stand up within 30 minutes of birth and nurse for the first time within an hour of birth. Mothers hide their newborn calves in one spot, returning regularly to allow the calf to nurse. An okapi calf starts trying solid food at just three weeks old and defecates (poops) for the first time between four and eight weeks of age. This helps keep predators from sniffing out the hidden newborns.

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Okapi Conservation Project
Okapi Conservation Project

The Okapi Conservation project is managed by White Oak Conservation Center, Inc. (WOCC) a not-for-profit organization founded in 2001 to conserve threatened species through the support of training, research, education, community outreach and protection. Thanks to the generous support of our donors, foundations and partner organizations WOCC has raised over $15M since its inception for wildlife conservation.

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Bongo Surveillance Project
Bongo Surveillance Project

The objective of the Bongo Surveillance Project is to protect and conserve the critically endangered eastern or mountain bongo and its habitat, by working with local communities and stakeholders worldwide

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July 16, 2013-bongo camera trap
July 16, 2013-bongo camera trap

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Camera Trap
Camera Trap

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Bongo Surveillance Project
Bongo Surveillance Project

The objective of the Bongo Surveillance Project is to protect and conserve the critically endangered eastern or mountain bongo and its habitat, by working with local communities and stakeholders worldwide

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Giraffe Conservation Foundation
Giraffe Conservation Foundation

The Giraffe Conservation Foundation's vision is that of a sustainable future where all giraffe populations and (sub)species are protected and secure in the wild.

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Open Wide!
Open Wide!

Giraffe are browsers and select mainly leaves and buds on trees and shrubs. Herbs, climbers and vines are also eaten, likewise flowers and fruit are preferred when in season. The proportion of grass in the diet is very low. Acacia leaves and shoots form the bulk of the giraffe's diet in most areas. Giraffe use their extremely dexterous and long tongue, as well as the ridged roof of their mouth to help feed on a variety of leaves and shoots – all dependent on the plants defenses!

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World Giraffe Day!
World Giraffe Day!

The first every World Giraffe Day is being held on the longest day of the year! June 21, 2014.

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Giraffe Conservation Foundation
Giraffe Conservation Foundation

The Giraffe Conservation Foundation's vision is that of a sustainable future where all giraffe populations and (sub)species are protected and secure in the wild.

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www.hirolaconservation.org
www.hirolaconservation.org

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Hirola Herd
Hirola Herd

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Hirola and gerenuk
Hirola and gerenuk

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www.hirolaconservation.org
www.hirolaconservation.org

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